ScienceShot: A Rare Turn-On

first_imgWhen it’s time to find a mate, the female guppy (Poecilia reticulata) hunts for someone special. The value she places on rarity—specifically, in the shiny, colored marking on a male’s body—may drive the surprising diversity of guppy patterns in the wild, according to new research published online today in Nature. In the lab, female guppies have shown a preference for males with uncommon markings. Now, researchers have confirmed these results in the wild by fiddling with the ratio of different fin patterns among pools of the fish in Trinidad. They sorted wild males into two groups based on whether their tail fins were mostly transparent (like the guppies in the left column, above) or mostly colored (right), then reintroduced them into different breeding pools so that one fin type outnumbered the other three to one. They waited 16 to 17 days while females mated with their favorite males in the bunch, then scooped up these pregnant females to run paternity tests on their broods. Based on the first round of offspring (693 guppies in all), they found that a rare male sired more than twice as many guppies as a common one, no matter which pattern he bore. The evolutionary reason behind the effect isn’t clear, but it could be a way of avoiding inbreeding between genetically similar fish to create a more diverse population.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

ScienceShot: Butterflies Sip Crocodile Tears

first_imgNever smile at a crocodile—or sit on its face and drink its tears. Yet that’s exactly what ecologist Carlos de la Rosa spotted a butterfly and a bee doing this past December as he boated down Costa Rica’s Puerto Viejo River. In one encounter (pictured above and caught on video), the spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus) placidly sunbathes on a fallen tree trunk as a Julia butterfly (Dryas iulia) and a solitary bee (Centris sp.) flutter around its face and taste its tears. The brave bugs’ tear-sipping behavior likely provides salts and proteins scarce in the tropics, de la Rosa writes this month in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. Scouring online photographs snapped by amateur photographers and other researchers, de la Rosa was surprised to find ample evidence of insects supping tears from crocodiles and other reptiles such as tortoises. He now thinks the practice may be more common than scientists once thought—just rare to witness.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Coach Gurbax wants parting gift from his wards

first_imgA bearded man, in his late 50s, shouting at the top of his voice and instructing his wards to follow their daily training regime is a common sight at the national boxing camp in NIS, Patiala.The man with a never-say-die attitude is national coach Gurbux Singh Sandhu, who helped India open their account at the Olympics and the World Championships. Scheduled to retire in July 2013, Sandhu wants a parting gift from his wards – to improve on their Beijing Olympics performance of a bronze medal.Sandhu said that he wants to end his career on a high and there could not be a better thing than to win more than one medal in London.”A coach wants to see his wards scaling new heights. When Vijender won bronze in Beijing, it was a high point for the entire coaching staff. Since boxers are more eager to win now, I want them to clinch more medals than they did in Beijing. I can’t say whether it will be a gold or silver but we are capable of winning them,” he told Mail Today.Sandhu, who has been the national coach since 1993, added: “I have seen the best and the worst days of Indian boxing in my coaching career. The current spell is the best and with little time left in my tenure, I want the boxers to do even better in London,” said Sandhu.The coach said his seven wards going to the London Olympics have the potential to improve on India’s Beijing show.advertisement”Boxing is such a sport where a lot depends on luck, draw and the boxer’s form on that particular day. But I feel the current lot is very motivated and talented and if they play to their potential, they can win more than one medal in London,” said Sandhu.From India, Laishram Devendro (49kg), Shiva Thapa (56kg), Jai Bhagwan (60kg), Manoj Kumar (64kg), Vikas Krishan (69kg), Vijender Kumar (75kg) and Sumit Sangwan (81kg) are the Olympics-bound boxers.Sandhu’s association with the sport goes back to his childhood days at Sainik School, Jamnagar, where boxing was a compulsory discipline.He was a state champion but as he says, his inclination was more towards studies. However, destiny willed otherwise and after finishing school, Sandhu joined Government Sports College, Jalandhar, and later studied to acquire a diploma in boxing coaching from the NIS in 1975. He went to Germany to pursue Masters in Sports and on his return, joined NIS in 1977-78.”Boxing has given me a lot of honour and coaching is my passion. But the extension of my tenure after July 2013 will be on the discretion of the Sports Authority of India,” said Sandhu.”But boxing is a team game for coaches also. Had I not had a good support staff, our boxers wouldn’t have had such wonderful results in major events. I hope the same support will take more than one boxer to the podium in London,” he signed off.last_img read more

Serena Williams opens clay season with a win in Rome

first_imgSerena Williams got her clay-court season off to a strong start with a 6-4, 6-3 win over 51st-ranked Anna-Lena Friedsam in the second round of the Italian Open on Tuesday.Having missed the Madrid Open last week due to a fever, top-ranked Williams showed no signs of illness, sending down crushing returns of serve for winners and dictating the long rallies.”I love the clay and it just really felt good out there tonight,” Williams said. “I was really happy with my level. I think I was really consistent. … I was really concerned how it would be just running and moving and recovering. But it was fun.”A 21-time Grand Slam winner, Williams hasn’t won a title since a hard-court event in Cincinnati last August.Williams was beaten by Angelique Kerber in this year’s Australian Open final, and then fell to Victoria Azarenka in the title-match in Indian Wells, California. In her only other appearance this year, Williams lost to Svetlana Kuznetsova in the fourth round of the Miami Open.A three-time Rome champion, Williams is warming up for the French Open, which starts in 12 days.Tough gameThe 22-year-old Friedsam reached the fourth round of the Australian Open this year and showed off a strong first serve, hitting six aces – one less than Williams – but was otherwise overmatched.”It wasn’t an easy match,” Williams said. “She’s an up-and-coming player and she plays well.”Also, 2011 U.S. Open champion Samantha Stosur rallied past American qualifier Alison Riske 4-6, 7-6 (5), 6-1 and rising British player Johanna Konta defeated Swedish qualifier Johanna Larsson 6-1, 6-2.advertisementNishikori advancesIn men’s second-round action, sixth-seeded Kei Nishikori beat Viktor Troicki 5-7, 6-2, 6-3 and eighth-seeded Tomas Berdych defeated Albert Ramos-Vinolas 6-3, 6-4.Nishikori surged ahead after Troicki got into a shouting match with the chair umpire at 1-1 in the second set.In the first round, ninth-seeded David Ferrer came back from a set down to defeat Italian wild card entry Filippo Volandri 4-6, 7-5, 6-1.Jankovic won this clay-court tournament in 2007 and 2008, but has gone three months without reaching a quarterfinal. Bouchard, the 2014 Wimbledon runner-up, slipped in the rankings last year but has rebounded with two finals this season.”I knew it would be a tough battle,” Bouchard said. “I realized that she started controlling too many points, so in the third set I decided no matter what, even if I make a couple more mistakes, I need to step in and go for it. That made the difference.”Also, U.S. Open champion Flavia Pennetta was honored with a tribute on the statue-lined Pietrangeli court. Pennetta retired at the end of last year.last_img read more

Sevashrams asked to give priority to students health

first_imgKoraput (Odisha), Jun 28 (PTI) Teachers of residential schools meant for SC and ST students (Sevashram) in Koraput district have been asked to give priority to health of students and sanitation in hostels.At a meeting held recently, teachers in the tribal dominated district were asked to focus on overall safety and security of the inmates, an official said.”The teachers will have to take attendance twice and not allow the students to leave the hostel. The principals have been asked to organise monthly health check-ups of the inmates. Also, the ANMs (auxiliary nursing midwifery) will maintain a health record of the girls,” said Koraput district Collector, Jaya Kumar V.At present, the administration has posted 49 ANMs for sevashrams and each ANM has been given the charge of five to six sevashrams where she will conduct health check-up of girl inmates on a regular basis.Officials said, according to guidelines, if any case of sexual assault comes to light in the sevashrams, it is the duty of the hostel authority to immediately inform the district administration and lodge a complaint at the nearest police station.On February 4, 2015, a 12 year-old class VI girl of Umuri sevashram had delivered a child in the hostel and this was followed by a Class VIII student of Kandulbeda sevashram delivering a baby on February 6.”The teachers have been asked to ensure that students are provided quality food and none of them are engaged in hostel cores. Education and safety of students at sevashrams are our priority,” he said.advertisementApart from academic activities, the teachers have been asked to promote sports and cultural activities in sevashrams to ensure overall development of students, he added.There are 156 sevashrams and 311 hostels with around 46,000 students in Koraput district. These are being run by the ST/SC development department.District welfare officer (Koraput) Trinath Rao said, It has been decided to have a review meeting in every three months regarding the functioning of the sevashrams. PTI COR SKN NNlast_img read more

Harmony Cup huge success

first_imgIn what was another great example of Touch Football bringing communities together, the second annual Harmony Cup was held at Doyle Ground, Parramatta on Sunday. Hosted by NSW Touch Football, Touch Football Australia (TFA) and the National Rugby League (NRL), the Harmony Cup saw participants from a variety of countries playing in games of Touch Football in both boys and girls divisions.Countries represented throughout the day included, Ghana, Malta, China, Sudan, the Cook Islands, Singapore, Australia, Tonga, Sri Lanka and Malaysia as well as many more. A number of players had limited Touch Football experience, but this didn’t stop them from having a lot of fun and learning about the game.Riley Sohier, NSW Touch Football Development Manager, spoke on the importance of events such as the Harmony Cup, and their ability to bring people together, as well as the benefit it can bring to those who are new to the country or a community, through involvement.TFA Participation Manager, Adam Raptis, also highlighted the importance of these days and the universal impact Touch Football can have due to its diverse and inclusive nature. Raptis also mentioned the 2015 FIT Touch Football World Cup, where a number of the nation’s playing today will be represented in late April next year. The eventual winners of the Girls competition for this year were the PCYC Spartans, who were victorious over the Baulkham Hills side, 2 – 0 whilst United Africa took out the Boys competition, overcoming the First Nation Academy, 5 – 2. All teams are already looking forward to next year’s event! Photos from the event will soon be available on the Touch Football Australia Facebook Page – www.facebook.com/touchfootballaustralia. Related LinksHarmony Cup!last_img read more

Shelves will be empty Supply of food in question after fire at

first_imgIQALUIT, Nunavut – Grocery retailers were moving Thursday to ensure critical supplies remained available in Nunavut’s capital after a fire destroyed significant parts of Iqaluit’s largest retail store.Another outlet stepped up to say it would accept a freighter-load of supplies originally intended for Northmart, where the fire broke out late Wednesday.“We have committed to the full freighter of inventory that was already in transit,” said Duane Wilson of Arctic Co-operatives, which owns Iqaluit’s other grocery store. “That’s probably (already) on the ground.“There’s going to be inventory in the community. There’s no immediate cause for panic.”Wilson added that Arctic Co-operatives will also increase its regular Friday air freight shipments to Iqaluit.The Northmart store offered everything from clothes to furniture to snowmobiles, as well as places to eat or sit for a coffee.“It’s the hub of the community,” said resident Mike Hadfield.“You go every day. There’s always something that you need.”When he heard about the fire, he headed to the Arctic Co-operatives store to stock up.“I went down there to make sure I got my milk and bread and cream and eggs, perishables to last me a week. Within 10 minutes of me leaving the store, I drove by again and you couldn’t find a parking spot within three blocks.“Their shelves will be empty by the end of the day.”Mayor Madeleine Redfern said the blaze started at the back of the building and had already destroyed the warehouse and several other facilities.“From what I’m seeing of the residents’ reactions, everyone is in shock and disbelief … very concerned,” she said. “We initially hoped the fire could be put out very quickly. Everyone is just waiting to see what the final outcome will be.”Redfern said a number of people work at the store, so “it’s a significant employer and a provider of products.”A nearby elders care home was evacuated as a precaution and Iqaluit residents were being asked to conserve water so that emergency crews would have an adequate supply for firefighting efforts.A school across from the store was closed for the morning.Most perishable food is flown year-round into the city of 7,700, while non-perishable food items and hard goods come in by sea.“The issue is ensuring that the other retailers are able to bring in enough supplies on an ongoing basis,” Redfern said. “In these situations, it’s important that we work together for the common good.”By late morning, most of the flames had been extinguished, although black smoke continued to billow, Hadfield said. Onlookers crowded the street.“There’s a lot of people gathered.”A spokeswoman for the government said the territory was looking into whether it has a role in keeping Iqaluit fed.“The (territory) is working closely with the city of Iqaluit to provide any and all support. Cold and heated storage (is) available for food storage if and when needed,” said Nasra Esak of Community and Government Services.The Health Department was working to ensure people get their medications.The RCMP were investigating the cause of the fire.— By Ken Trimble and Bob Weber in Edmontonlast_img read more

Trudeau addresses multiple instances of blackface brownface at Saskatoon town hall

first_imgSASKATOON (NEWS 1130) — Questions about photos and videos of Justin Trudeau in blackface and brownface followed him to a town hall in Saskatoon Thursday.Trudeau adjusted his plans for the stop in the city, opting to take questions instead of proceeding with a campaign rally.The hour-long town hall saw the Liberal leader take questions on a range of policy issues. Early on, two men in the largely friendly crowd forced Trudeau to confront a number of photos and videos that have surfaced in the last two days.First, he was asked to say how many times he has appeared in blackface or brownface.“I’ll make it easy: Is it possible to round to the nearest five?” a man in the crowd asked.The question prompted an apology from Trudeau.“Far too many people in this country face discrimination and intolerance on a daily basis. What I did was inexcusable and wrong, and hurt a lot of people who considered me to be an ally. That is wrong and I am deeply, deeply sorry,” he said.Related stories:It’s shaken the election campaign, but has Trudeau’s brownface image shaken the trust of voters?‘Insulting,’ ‘shocking,’ troubling:’ Party leaders react to photo of Trudeau in brownfaceTrudeau apologizes for ‘racist’ brownface yearbook photoTrudeau issued his first apology Wednesday, after Time magazine published a 2001 photo of him in brownface at an “Arabian Nights” gala when he was a teacher at a Vancouver private school in 2001, saying he understands that what he did was racist but did not see it as such at the time. At that time he said there was one other instance of him appearing in “make up” during a high school talent show.But by Thursday, a third instance had come to light. After he issued a second apology, he was asked again how many other times has he done this. He hesitated, and admitted he couldn’t remember.“I am wary of being definitive about this because of the recent pictures that came out, I had not remembered,” he told a crown in Winnipeg Thursday morning.The second man who raised the issue at Thursday night’s town hall, wearing a yellow vest, urged Trudeau not to apologize anymore.“Please, when we have this debate let’s not go back digging up bones 15 years. What are we doing now and in the present?” he asked.“I appreciate the sentiment but there was no excusing what I did and I’m sorry that I did it. But at the same time, yes, we do need to focus on how we move forward as a country on many, many big issues. One of those issues is making sure that your leaders don’t hurt people who already face discrimination and marginalization too much in their daily lives,” Trudeau answered.last_img read more

Google CEO faces House grilling on breach China censorship

first_imgWASHINGTON — Google’s CEO faces a grilling from U.S. lawmakers on how the web search giant handled an alarming data breach and whether it may bend to Chinese government censorship demands.CEO Sundar Pichai’s appearance Tuesday before the House Judiciary Committee comes after he angered members of a Senate panel in September by declining their invitation to testify about foreign governments’ manipulation of online services to sway U.S. elections. Pichai’s no-show at that hearing was marked by an empty chair for Google alongside the Facebook and Twitter executives.Pichai went to Washington later in September to mend fences. He took part last week in a White House meeting with other tech industry executives that focused mainly on getting government and businesses working more closely on accelerating emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence.Marcy Gordon, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Annan urges Bolivians to resolve differences over national interests peacefully

Concerned over the growing social tensions in Bolivia, United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan today urged the population of the South American country to resolve their differences over major national questions peacefully and democratically.“The Secretary-General calls on all citizens to engage in a constructive dialogue to allow for the democratic and non-violent resolution of their differences,” which he named as “the use of natural resources, questions of regional autonomy and proposals for a constituent assembly,” his spokesman said in a statement.Mr. Annan also reaffirmed the need to abide by constitutional principles and to respect human rights fully.“The United Nations is ready to assist all Bolivians in finding solutions to the challenges they are facing,” the statement said. read more

UN food aid organization warns of food cuts for 6 million people

“While the news cameras are focused on the conflict in Lebanon, the situation in Sudan has quietly grown more dangerous and desperate than ever,” said World Food Programme (WFP) Sudan Representative Kenro Oshidari. “As we continue to press for peace in Darfur, we must ensure that food aid gets to millions of hungry people trapped by violence.”In May, WFP was forced to cut food rations by half due to funding shortages. This time, unless $350 million in funds are raised, the agency could be forced to put beneficiaries on a reduced-calorie diet. “The minimum standard food basket represents some 2,100 calories per person. With such a diet one person can survive. If you reduce the calories the implication will be a slow degradation of the nutritional status ending ultimately with starvation,” WFP spokeswoman Ellen Gustafson told the UN News Service.The escalating violence has been another hindrance in getting food to nearly half a million people living in camps as the deaths of 11 relief workers has prompted concern by humanitarian actors working in the region.“The safety of staff is crucial and we take great precautions to avoid dangerous situations,” Mr. Oshidari said. The organization says it can limit the risk on the ground by moving staff by air only, advocating for a political solution and raising awareness of the dire conditions on the ground through the media.”The three-year conflict in Darfur between Sudanese government forces, pro-government militias and rebels has seen many thousands killed and more than 2 million forced to flee to camps. There have been widespread charges of civilian massacre, rape and other atrocities. read more

AlJazeera America names Joie Chen to host nightly newsmagazine program

Al-Jazeera America names Joie Chen to host nightly newsmagazine program AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email by The Associated Press Posted Jul 24, 2013 11:06 am MDT NEW YORK, N.Y. – Joie (JOH’-ee) Chen is returning to television as host of the new Al-Jazeera America network’s flagship newsmagazine, “America Tonight.”The network, which premieres on Aug. 20, announced the hire on Wednesday. Chen has worked at CBS News and PBS but is best known for a decade spent at CNN. She’s been out of television for the past couple of years.Paul Eedle, Al-Jazeera America’s deputy launch manager for programs, called Chen “a strong journalist with a natural, warm presence on screen.”“America Tonight” will air each weeknight, but Al-Jazeera hasn’t said exactly when. It is one of the few specific programs announced in advance of the launch. read more

First Garda recruitment drive since 2009 begins today

first_imgTWENTY THOUSAND PEOPLE are expected to apply for new garda positions announced by the Justice Minister today.Alan Shatter officially confirmed the recruitment campaign today, calling it an important step for the force.The first intake, which is understood will include about 100 men and women, will enter the garda college in Templemore in the middle of next year.The Minister also noted that the development will offer a boost to the Tipperary town.They will undergo 32 weeks of tuition and a further 72 weeks of on-the-job learning. They will be awarded a BA in Applied Policing when they complete the two-year training programme.Details of the appointments can be found on PublicJobs.ie and the closing date is 9 January 2014.Some of the eligibility requirements include passing a physical competence test and a medical exam and the minimum educational attainment is a pass Leaving Certificate.All successful applicants must also “be of good character” and aged between 18 and 35.Read: New Garda recruitment campaign to begin tomorrowMore: Commissioner welcomes garda recruitment “as soon as possible” >last_img read more

Sole trader

first_img“It’s a mess,” says Steve Rekaris, as he leads me into his back room workshop in Melbourne’s Lonsdale Street, “but I know where everything is,” he adds confidently. Walls are piled high with shoeboxes, surfaces are covered with knives, pots of glue, tacks, hammers, heel pads and every conceivable piece of footwear in varying states of disrepair and salvation. “We try and do a good job at a reasonable price,” says Steve about the business he has run since taking it over from his dad Bill. “It’s something people need, and you can’t get it on the internet.”The Rekaris family has been making and repairing shoes, in Greece and Australia, for the best part of a century. It was Steve’s grandfather who began the tradition in the 1920s in the village of Nestorio, northern Greece. His son Vassilios, the eldest of three children, arrived in Melbourne in 1954 and after working for General Motors, Bill opened the doors of Rekaris Shoes in 1958 in the heart of Melbourne.For the next 20 years, by dint of hard work, the business grew in its Exhibition Street premises, offering expert shoe repairs and hand-made footwear at a reasonable price. “I learned from my grandfather and my father,” says Steve, who took over the family business when it moved to its first Lonsdale Street address in the late ’70s. Rekaris Shoes relocated to its current address in the Greek Community building just three years ago. Moving location has been a regular occurrence: a result of the regularly changing built environment that is Melbourne’s commercial heart. The shoe business has changed too, says Steve. “There’s a lot of throwaway shoes these days. Men are buying more from the internet.” What makes a good shoe? “One that fits, one where the designer has thought about how it works, one which has a zip that doesn’t break on the first day of wearing.” While the shop stocks only men’s shoes for sale, as Rekaris says “you need to carry too much stock for women’s shoes”, women’s shoe repairs is a big part of the trade. “People let there shoes go too far these days,” says Steve. “We rejuvenate them, and still make the odd pair. Vintage is in vogue these days.” As well as making shoes, the shop also acts as a distributor for other handmade shoemakers in Victoria. Two generations of Melburnians have crossed the threshold of Rekaris Shoes, but perhaps its most famous customers are the professional cricketers from interstate and beyond, who have rocked up in search of match-winning footwear. “It started years back, when Reebok sent the South African Test cricketer Gary Kirsten, who was touring here at the time. “He wanted the normal soles on his favourite pair of runners replaced with spikes. Word spread and soon Steve Waugh and Brett Lee were getting their’s done. A lot of the Victorian players get them done here.” At 83, Steve’s father is still involved but semi-retired, overseeing the family’s second shop in Coburg, the premises he bought 50 years back for his own father. What makes a sustainable business that can last three generations? “It is about hard work, but you must also love your work,” says Bill on the line from Queensland, where he’s on vacation – fishing, away from the chilly drizzle of a Victorian winter. Meanwhile, Steve’s pastime of choice away from the shop has always been surfing. The cobbler, who has always found his relaxation at Bells Beach, will be the last Rekaris to run the family business. Steve is unmarried and has no children. “It would be good to create some kind of apprenticeship, I’m the last in line.” Rekaris Shoes will be on the move once more soon. “I’m going to have to leave again,” says Steve, referring to the 12 month’s notice he has been given on his lease, following the decision to demolish the present Greek Community building in order to develop the new $14 million ‘Hellenic Tower’ on the site. “Either I stay in the city or I go to dad’s shop in Coburg, If I go there, I hope people will follow me there. I’ll do pick up and delivery. We might be here longer, who knows. Business is business,” he says philosophically. No doubt wherever Rekaris Shoes opens its doors, customers wanting its time-honoured values of hand-made quality will follow in its footsteps. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Plus de la moitié des Français utilise lhoméopathie

first_imgPlus de la moitié des Français utilise l’homéopathieUne récente étude menée par Ipsos pour les Laboratoires Boiron indique que les Français seraient 53% à utiliser des médicaments homéopathiques. Ce résultat indique une augmentation de la consommation depuis quelques années, de ces produits issus de la médecine douce.Il y a quelques années, en 2004, seuls 39% des Français consommaient de l’homéopathie. Aujourd’hui en 2011, ils seraient 53% à opter pour cette médecine douce qui reste pourtant mal connue. Les médicaments homéopathiques auraient ainsi trouvé leur place dans 80% des foyers français et ce, bien que 20% de ceux-ci utilisent ces médicament en ignorant la nature des produits qu’ils possèdent. À lire aussiAntihistaminique : qu’est-ce que c’est ? A quoi ça sert ?L’homéopathie serait essentiellement utilisée dans le cadre de “pathologies chroniques et aigües”, notamment pour contrer les maladies hivernales pour 56% des cas, les bosses et petits hématomes pour 52% des cas, le stress, les poussées dentaires et les allergies.Réalisé par Ipsos, le sondage indique également que l’homéopathie serait utilisée par des adultes à 53%, contre 45% par les enfants. “Les gens se tournent de plus en plus vers des méthodes de soins alternatives. Or, l’homéopathie est une des seules médecines douces remboursée dans sa quasi-intégralité, contrairement à la phytothérapie par exemple. Et c’est une médecine qui permet très aisément l’automédication.” a expliqué à France Soir, le Dr Christine Coquart, homéopathe à Paris. Ainsi, 65% des utilisateurs disent utiliser l’homéopathie pour son côté “naturel” et 49% pour éviter les médicaments “chimiques”. Pourtant, les personnes interrogées sur le sujet pointent du doigt le manque d’information circulant autour de cette médecine douce tandis que 69% des sondés estiment que c’est le médecin qui pourrait être le plus à même de répondre à leurs questions sur le sujet.Le 4 avril 2011 à 18:51 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

Ad Agencies Deeply Concerned About New Safari AdTracking Limits

first_img iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro Have More Cameras, More ProblemsApple Arcade Launches Next Week In June—when the iPhone X was still just a glint in hopeful consumers’ eyes—Apple introduced a new program that reduces cross-site ad tracking in Safari.Dubbed Intelligent Tracking Prevention, the WebKit feature identifies those websites that follow users across domains, and takes action against them.Let’s say example.com, for example, is classified as a cross-site tracker. If you’ve not interacted with that mobile page in the last 30 days, Safari automatically purges the site’s cookies, and continues erasing new data.A new 24-hour limit, which turns sites from first-party to third-party domains, helps to clean out the browser and restrict unwanted long-term cookies and data.“We are aware that this feature may create challenges for legitimate website storage, i.e. storage not intended for cross-site tracking,” Apple said in a summer announcement. “Please let us know of such cases and we will try to help.”Last week, six major advertising trade associations took Cupertino up on its offer.The American Association of Advertising Agencies (4A’s), American Advertising Federation, Association of National Advertisers, Data & Marketing Association, Interactive Advertising Bureau, and Network Advertising Alliance on Thursday released an open letter outlining “deep concerns” over Safari 11’s cookie-handling function.“We are deeply concerned about the Safari 11 browser update that Apple plans to release, as it overrides and replaces existing user-controlled cookie preferences with Apple’s own set of opaque and arbitrary standards for cookie handling,” the memo said.Intelligent Tracking Prevention, the groups argued, “would change the rules by which cookies are set and recognized by browsers.”While Safari already blocks third-party cookies (those set by a domain other than the one being visited), the new functionality, according to the letter, “would create a set of haphazard rules” for the use of first-party cookies (those set by a domain the user chooses to visit)—”without notice or choice.”“The infrastructure of the modern Internet depends on consistent and generally applicable standards for cookies,” the agencies said. “Apple’s Safari move breaks those standards and replaces them with an amorphous set of shifting rules that will hurt the user experience and sabotage the economic model for the Internet.“Apple’s unilateral and heavy-handed approach is bad for consumer choice and bad for the ad-supported online content and services consumers love. Blocking cookies in this manner will drive a wedge between brands and their customers, and it will make advertising more generic and less timely and useful.”Them’s fightin’ words.The trade groups “strongly encourage” Cupertino to rethink its plan. Though I’m not holding my breath for a change of heart from the tech titan.“Put simply, machine-driven cookie choices do not represent user choice; they represent browser-manufacturer choice,” the joint letter said. “As organizations devoted to innovation and growth in the consumer economy, we will actively oppose any actions like this by companies that harm consumers by distorting the digital advertising ecosystem and undermining its operations.”Apple did not immediately respond to Geek’s request for comment.Safari 11 ships with iOS 11 and macOS 10.13, rolling out to devices starting tomorrow, Sept. 19.Google, meanwhile, is expected to launch its own Chrome ad blocker early next year.Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. Stay on targetlast_img read more

Petersen Trumps Trombley

first_imgAnchorage voters kept four out of five city assembly incumbents in their seats on Tuesday. But two races ended unpredictably by the time the polls closed and most of the votes were tallied up.Download Audio In East Anchorage, challenger Pete Petersen upset incumbent Adam Trombley, taking nearly 42 percent of the vote. Trombley finished the night with 37 percent, while a third challenger for the District 5 seat, Mao Tosi, took 20 percent. Petersen was not shy about declaring victory Tuesday, as supporters rallied around him at election central. Petersen said he’d worked hard for votes. “I’ve been out there talking to people since last October. You know, when you knock on people’s doors and take time to listen to them, they appreciate it, and they get a chance to know you, personally, as a person. It’s not just an add that they see on tv, or an add that they hear on the radio, or a piece of paper in the mail. They’ve actually met you , and I think that makes a big difference. “If the Peterson-Trombley race is close, the District 6 race is a real squeaker. Three candidates are vying for that seat, to be vacated by a termed out Assemblyman. By Tuesday night’s count, Bill Evans had 41 percent of the vote, while Bruce Dougherty had just under 39 percent. The third candidate, Pete Nolan, has 19 percent of the vote.Anchorage voters also passed eight out of nine ballot propositions. A five point five million dollar bond package aimed at library improvements and a ballpark relocation failed by a narrow margin.City election officials say the six thousand outstanding absentee and early ballots should be tallied next week.   Questioned ballots, by city law, have to be counted the day after an election, and that process started on Wednesday.  Official election results will be certified on April 15.last_img read more

Staterun raffle could be new way to fund schools

first_imgSen. Click Bishop, R-Fairbanks, speaks in the Alaska Senate on April 15. Bishop sponsored legislation to fund public schools using a statewide raffle. (Photo by Skip Gray/360 North)Alaskans could have a new choice for what to do with their permanent fund dividends next year – a raffle that would fund public schools. Lawmakers passed House Bill 213, a measure that would start a raffle that could pay a top prize as high as $24 million in the future.Listen nowAt a time when Alaska lawmakers have struggled to close the gap between how much the state spends and what it brings in, finding new funding for public schools has been hard.Fairbanks Republican Sen. Click Bishop said he heard a wish during public testimony on the budget, year after year.“ ‘I wish I had a way to donate my permanent fund to… the general fund, or education,’” Bishop said. “And now you’ve got a vehicle to do that.”Bishop combined the idea of donating money with a strategy other states use to fund schools: a lottery.“I think there’s 15 other states that have year-round education lotteries,” Bishop said. “And this is just an old-fashioned bucket raffle.”Here’s how it would work: each Alaskan adult would be able to donate $100 increments to the raffle, when they apply for their PFD. Each $100 would count as one raffle entry. And once per year, four winners would be drawn. Kids couldn’t participate.This cartoon depicts how the donations from PFDs would be divided under the recently passed bill. The cartoon is by John Manley, who has worked as an aide to Sen. Click Bishop (R-Fairbanks). Bishop is depicted in the upper left corner. (Screenshot from the Alaska Legislature site)Each $100 would be split three ways. Half would go directly toward schools. A quarter of the donation would go to the raffle fund. And a quarter would be used to start a new state education endowment. Once that endowment fund hits $1 billion, it would pay out money each year to schools.Of the raffle fund, 8 percent would go to the top prize, with smaller amounts going to three others.The idea of donating money through the PFD may sound familiar. It’s the same method as Pick.Click.Give. That’s the program that allows Alaskans to donate to designated nonprofits.And the bill has raised concern among Pick.Click.Give. supporters. Anchorage independent Rep. Jason Grenn is the former manager for Pick.Click.Give. Grenn noted that donations have dropped due to the recession. And he sees the education raffle further squeezing the nonprofits.“I fear that a program that has been innovative and has raised tens of millions of dollars for hundreds of nonprofits across our state will start to see the deterioration even further,” Grenn said.No one knows how much Alaskans would give to the program. Bishop used $60 million a year as a long-term target. That’s 600,000 of those $100 entries — an average of more than one per Alaskan adult. Pick.Click.Give. gets $2.5 million in total donations per year.But it’s much less than the $350 million Alaskans currently spend on various forms of legal gaming, from pull tabs to bingo.Fairbanks Democratic Rep. David Guttenberg voted against the raffle.“This is a gaming bill disguised as educational funding,” Guttenberg said. “That’s all it is.”Guttenberg said lower-income residents could be hurt.“We fight amongst ourselves on how much we’re going to give in the permanent fund (dividends), because we want to give the people as much as we could possibly give, and now we’re put a temptation in front of them to gamble it away,” Guttenberg said.But others said that it’s unfair to see the bill as primarily a form of gambling. That’s because most of the donations will go to fund schools, and only a small share will go to raffle winnings.Bishop noted that gambling already exists in the state.“Well, if we were so concerned about gambling away our permanent fund, then how come there hasn’t been a hue and cry to repeal the 18 different types of gaming that’s in Alaska now that you can play year-round, that does not benefit education,” Bishop said. “This bill benefits the children.”It could take decades for the raffle fund to reach its maximum size under the bill of $300 million. Once it reaches that point, more of the donations would be directed to the new education endowment.Bishop is hopeful about the bill. And even in the worst case, he said the state won’t be worse off.“The proof’s in the pudding,” Bishop said. “It might be a total flop, but you know what? We were trying something.”Bishop said he plans to put at least $100 of his dividend into the raffle each year. But he has a higher priority for his PFD – saving for college for his four grandchildren.The Legislature hasn’t officially transmitted the bill to Gov. Bill Walker yet.last_img read more

Physics group uses graphene to allow electron microscopy of liquid objects

first_img Journal information: Science © 2012 Phys.Org Up till now, studying so-called wet chemistry objects using an electron microscope has been more than a little tricky. This is because such microscopes require specimens to be held in a vacuum while being dosed with electrons. Unfortunately, liquids tend to vaporize when put into a vacuum, making them pretty hard to study. Up to now, researchers have been forced to use less than optimal substances to hold the materials in place, such as silicon nitride. Unfortunately, because such materials tend to be rather thick, the images created using them haven’t been of very high quality. Citation: Physics group uses graphene to allow electron microscopy of liquid objects (2012, April 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-04-physics-group-graphene-electron-microscopy.html Explore further Graphene, as most know by now, is a single sheet of carbon atoms, highly touted for its unusual electrical properties, its transparency and of course it’s strength. It’s the second property that got this research team interested. They wondered what would happen if graphene was used to trap a liquid when placed in vacuum and then under an electron microscope. Because it’s just one atom thick, they figured, it should allow for the creation of much higher quality images than they’d managed with other materials.To find out, they created a sealed sandwich made up of two layers of graphene, covering a layer of platinum ions in a liquid solution. They wanted to see if they could actually watch platinum nanocrystals being formed, which would go a long ways towards understanding how the whole process works. They then placed the sandwich into the electron microscope vacuum to see how things progressed.To sum up, it worked quite well. The group reports that they were able to watch the nanocrystals grow with remarkable clarity and don’t see any reason why the same approach wouldn’t work for other wet chemistry samples, which would open up the use of electron microscopy to a whole new area of science, namely, biochemistry.There is the problem of how biological specimens react to being bombarded with electrons, essentially radiation, however. Thus far, no one really knows if the graphene will provide any protection for the material being studied, but this team is anxious to find out. No doubt once they do, another paper will be forthcoming describing those results as well. This shows TEM images of platinum nanocrystal coalescence and their faceting in the growth solution. Credit: KAISTcenter_img More information: High-Resolution EM of Colloidal Nanocrystal Growth Using Graphene Liquid Cells, Science 6 April 2012: Vol. 336 no. 6077 pp. 61-64. DOI: 10.1126/science.1217654ABSTRACTWe introduce a new type of liquid cell for in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) based on entrapment of a liquid film between layers of graphene. The graphene liquid cell facilitates atomic-level resolution imaging while sustaining the most realistic liquid conditions achievable under electron-beam radiation. We employ this cell to explore the mechanism of colloidal platinum nanocrystal growth. Direct atomic-resolution imaging allows us to visualize critical steps in the process, including site-selective coalescence, structural reshaping after coalescence, and surface faceting. (Phys.org) — News of new uses for graphene continue to come in with remarkable regularity, and now a team of physicists, as they describe in their paper published in the journal Science, have figured out a way to use it to create a sandwich that can be used to study objects under an electron microscope that are immersed in liquid. Researchers find molybdenite may be better suited for integrated logic circuits than graphene Image(c) Alivisatos, Lee and Zettl research groups, LBNL. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

West Bengal State University holds workshops on Maths Statistics

first_imgKolkata: In a significant stride towards arousing interest among students in pursuing Mathematics and Statistics, the West Bengal State University (WBSU) is holding a series of workshops in one of its affiliated colleges in Lake Town. Students from some leading government and government-sponsored schools in the state, along with their teachers are being invited to take part in such a workshop.The State university has collaborated with the Indian Statistical Institute (ISI) based in Baranagar for holding such workshops in East Calcutta Girl’s College in Lake Town. The entire project is being funded by RC Bose Centre for Cryptology and Security. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life”We have been witnessing that subjects like Statistics and Economics are finding a few takers at the graduation level. Our main aim is to encourage students to take up these subjects for higher studies as proper knowledge of these subjects can open up a wide-vista of job opportunities,” Vice-Chancellor of WBSU, Basab Chaudhuri said.Students from Hindu School, Hare School, Sanskrit Collegiate School have already taken part in two previous workshops. The major initiative for holding such workshops have been taken by former ISI director Bimal Roy. Leading experts from ISI and other premier institutes across the state are offering lectures at the workshop. The programme will continue for a period of three years and as many as eight workshops will be held every year. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedPrincipal of East Calcutta Girl’s College Sukla Hazra said: “A number of students studying in classes XI and XII are gripped by a sense of fear associated with Mathematics. The workshops are designed in a way to overcome such fear. Mathematics and Statistics have close links and a proper understanding of Mathematics is essential for Statistics.”It may be mentioned that the workshops’ participatory nature allowing students to take part in the classes have evoked good response from the students. It may be mentioned that WBSU has introduced a course in Human Resource Development from this academic year catering to the demands of women trying to pursue counseling as a career option.WBSU with its 46 affiliated colleges in North 24 Parganas has 30 departments with 1.5 lakh students pursuing various courses in the university. “A majority of our students are first generation learners. In East Calcutta Girl’s College itself, there are 20 percent fast generation learners, while in colleges in Bongaon and Basirhat, the percentage of such learners goes up to nearly 70 percent,” Chaudhuri said.last_img read more